Tara Moss: observations from Syrian refugee camps in Lebanon

Australian author and UNICEF Child Survival Ambassador, Tara Moss has just returned from Lebanon where she visited refugees from the Syrian conflict.

What she saw in the camps and informal settlements has had a deep impact on her.

Tara is particularly concerned that the plight of Syrian refugees has slipped off the news agenda.

“I can’t turn away. We can’t turn away” she said.

Tara Moss’s new mission

Tara speaks to Sunrise about her time visiting refugee camps in Lebanon where millions of Syrian refugees are living, having fled from the violent conflict in Syria, and why she is raising money for UNICEF’s work.

 

One brave girl’s story shines amid shocking scenes of hardship in a sea of Syrian refugees

I am sitting cross-legged on a concrete slab in a home that is not a home.

This is a makeshift shelter of corrugated iron and plastic sheeting, about the size of a parking spot, and it accommodates a displaced Syrian family with three young children. There is no door. Directly outside the open entrance is the dust and weather of the Bekaa Valley in east Lebanon, bringing extreme heat in the summer and sub-zero temperatures in the winter. To enter this home, you walk between makeshift dwellings, ducking beneath cobbled-together electrical wires which are shared between shelters as their only source of power – when they can get any power…

Interview with Amanda Palmer and Neil Gaiman

Amanda Palmer knows all about asking. Performing as a living statue in a wedding dress, she wordlessly asked thousands of passersby for their dollars. But she finds there are important things in life that she can’t ask for and she learns that she isn’t alone in this. In her new book, she explores and discovers the emotional, philosophical, and practical aspects of the Art of Asking

Highlights of the Art of Asking. Presented by the Sydney writers festival and recorded live at the Enmore theatre, 20th January 2015:

Featuring Tara Moss, Amanda Palmer, Neil Gaiman and Sxip Shirey.

Interview with Australian of the Year Rosie Batty

When two young men lose their lives in drunken assaults in the space of a few weeks, governments declare ‘Enough is enough’, and enact strict regulation to prevent another incident. But despite one Australian woman being killed by a current or former partner every week, family violence doesn’t attract anywhere near an equivalent amount of airtime, or popular outrage.

Rosie Batty awed Australians with her eloquence and compassion after her 11-year-old son Luke was murdered by his estranged father in February 2014. In the intervening year she’s shown that that extraordinary resolve was no fluke, as she’s worked tirelessly to encourage a conversation about family violence in Australia – one that might help us work out what we can do to stop it.

Rosie Batty’s 11-year-old son Luke was murdered by his father Greg Anderson at cricket practice in Tyabb in February 2014. She has since become a domestic violence campaigner and has eloquently spoken out against family violence. She was named Victorian of the Year in October 2014, Daily Life Woman of the Year 2014 and was recently awarded Australian of the Year 2015. Rosie Batty awed Australians with her eloquence and compassion after her 11-year-old son Luke was murdered by his estranged father in February 2014. In the intervening year she’s worked tirelessly to encourage a conversation about family violence.

Here Rosie tells her story and is interviewed by Patron of the Full Stop Foundation Tara Moss.